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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
phones are being monitored by the national security agency. that's according to a "the washington post" according to edward snowden. the spy agency says it does not collect data from phones in the u.s. >> the rescuers are holding out little hope for whales stranded in the ever glades. 4 dozen short-finned pilot whales swam into the shallows. six died. vets youthanized four more. a wealthy neighbourhood in louisiana wants to form its own city. we have more from baton rouge. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren at baton rouge. >> they are not in school, but he knows education will be the key to a better life. >> i want them to go to school and learn what they can. >> it's a challenge in a city where 60% of the students are not learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems. how many generations of children do you disserve before you try sag different. >> lionel rainy is part of a group pushing for a different plan. the city of st george would encompass an area home to a quarter of the residents. if would control and run its own schools with tax re
the national security agency basically patrolling all the cell phones in the world basically. a lot of young people point to privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more like seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom. by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, they spend so much time texting and instagrami instagraming. something is coming up every single day. and so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyberspace. now, the challenge is, first of all, we do have people trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. if we're going to do a good job preventing a terror attack, a weapon of mass destruction getting on to the new york subway system, et cetera
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
the story about the national security agency basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically. a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments for people signing up, they want to keep their privacy. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare, people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issues a broader issue. young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and so i am. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming. >> whatever. >> something's coming up every single day. so all of us spend more and more of o
security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments to people wanting to sign up? they want to keep their privacy? >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend mo
the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. that's why we talk to the opposition all the time. >> reporter: as first reported by the "wall street journal" the u.s. and gulf nations are engaging with islamist groups in order to strengthen those who are not directly linked to the al qaeda franchises in syria. while these groups including the newly organized islamic front are not members of al qaeda, they still fly the black flag and support the establishment of an islamic state within syria, which runs counter to democratic principles. as for the syrian president assad, who's agreed to send a delegation to january peace talks in geneva, switzerland, d
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)